Weight-Bearing Real-time Feedback Service
Support patients' recovery outside of the clinic wall
through the entire rehabilitation process
How Smart Crutch Tip Devices Work
Patient adheres to WB program using feedback cues from tips and app. Data is sent to doctor's phone and PC
Registration in the app
Walking with crutches
Step analytics
Doctor sets weight bearing (WB) program for duration of patient's recovery
Patient adjusts the load on injured leg according to doctor's instructions
Doctor's Dashboard
Doctor monitors how the patient loads the injured leg, addresses patient concerns, and adapts program to patient's needs
ComeBack Mobility^ Аllows А Doctor To:
Set and control axial load
Track in real time patient step data
Identify causes of pain and swelling
Empower the patient in their rehabilitation
We Help People Rehabilitate After
HIP JOINT
ANKLE JOINT
KNEE JOINT
FOOT
HIP THIGH
SHIN
Endoprosthetics
• S32.4 - Fracture of acetabulum
• S72.0 - Fracture of head and neck of femur
• S72.1 - Pertrochanteric fracture
• M16.0 - Bilateral primary osteoarthritis of hip
  • M16.1 - Unilateral primary osteoarthritis of hip
  • M16.2 - Bilateral osteoarthritis resulting from hip dysplasia
  • M16.3 - Unilateral osteoarthritis resulting from hip dysplasia
  • M16.9 - Osteoarthritis of hip, unspecified
  • M24.7 - Protrusio acetabuli
  • M45 - Ankylosing spondylitis
  • М069 - Rheumatoid arthritis, unspecified
  • М870 - Idiopathic aseptic necrosis of bone
Osteosynthesis
  • S32.4 - Fracture of acetabulum
  • S72.7 - Subtrochanteric fracture of femur
  • S72.8 - Other fracture of femur
  • S72.9 - Unspecified fracture of femur
  • S72.1 - Pertrochanteric fracture
  • Corrective osteotomy
Injury
  • S32.4 - Fracture of acetabulum
  • S70.0 - Contusion of hip
  • S72.8 - Other fracture of femur
  • S72.9 - Unspecified fracture of femur
  • S73.0 - Subluxation and dislocation of hip
  • S73.1 - Sprain of hip
Diseases
  • M16.0 - Bilateral primary osteoarthritis of hip
  • M16.1 - Unilateral primary osteoarthritis of hip
  • M16.2 - Bilateral osteoarthritis resulting from hip dysplasia
  • M16.3 - Unilateral osteoarthritis resulting from hip dysplasia
  • М16.4 - Bilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of hip
  • М16.5 - Unilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of hip
  • M16.9 - Osteoarthritis of hip, unspecified
  • M19.9 - Osteoarthritis, unspecified site
Endoprosthetics
  • M17.0 - Bilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.1 - Unilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.2 - Bilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.3 - Unilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.4 - Other bilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.5 - Other unilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee
Arthroscopy
  • S83.2 - Tear of meniscus, current injury
  • S83.3 - Tear of articular cartilage of knee, current
  • S83.4 -Sprain of collateral ligament of knee
  • S83.5 - Sprain of cruciate ligament of knee
  • S83.9- Sprain of unspecified site of knee
  • M17.0 - Bilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.1 - Unilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.2 - Bilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.3 - Unilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.4 - Other bilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee

  • M17.5 - Other unilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M23.2 - Derangement of meniscus due to old tear or injury
  • M23.8 - Other internal derangements of knee
  • M24.4 - Recurrent dislocation of joint
  • M25.0 - Hemarthrosis
  • M25.4 - Effusion of joint
Injury
  • S83.1 - Subluxation and dislocation of knee
  • S83.2 - Tear of meniscus, current injury
  • S83.3 - Tear of articular cartilage of knee, curren
  • S83.4 - Sprain of collateral ligament of knee
  • S83.5 - Sprain of cruciate ligament of knee
  • М23.4 - Loose body in knee
  • М24.0 - Loose body in joint
Diseases
  • M17.0 - Bilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.1 - Unilateral primary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.2 - Bilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.3 - Unilateral post-traumatic osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.4 - Other bilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M17.5 - Other unilateral secondary osteoarthritis of knee
  • M23.2 - Derangement of meniscus due to old tear or injury
  • M23.8 - Other internal derangements of knee
  • M24.4 - Recurrent dislocation of joint
  • M25.0 - Hemarthrosis
  • M25.4 - Effusion of joint
  • М65 - Synovitis and tenosynovitis
  • М12.2 - Villonodular synovitis (pigmented)
Osteosynthesis
  • S92.0 - Fracture of calcaneus
  • S92.1 - Fracture of talus
  • S92.2 - Fracture of other and unspecified tarsal bone(s)
  • S92.3 - Fracture of metatarsal bone(s)
Injury
  • S92.0 - Fracture of calcaneus
  • S92.1 - Fracture of talus
  • S92.2 - Fracture of other and unspecified tarsal bone(s)
  • S92.3 - Fracture of metatarsal bone(s
  • S92.9 - Unspecified fracture of foot and toe
  • S93.1 - Subluxation and dislocation of toe
  • S93.3 - Subluxation and dislocation of foot
Diseases
  • M93.9 - Osteochondropathy, unspecified
  • M20.1 - Hallux valgus (acquired)
  • M21.4 - Flat foot [pes planus] (acquired)
Osteosynthesis
  • S82.5 - Fracture of medial malleolus
  • S82.6 - Fracture of lateral malleolus
  • S82.8- Other fractures of lower leg
Arthroscopy
  • M25.5 - Pain in joint
  • M93.2 - Osteochondritis dissecans
  • M65.9 - Synovitis and tenosynovitis, unspecified

  • M25.0 - Hemarthrosis
  • M25.7 - Osteophyte
Injury
  • S82.5 - Fracture of medial malleolus
  • S82.6 - Fracture of lateral malleolus
  • S82.8- Other fractures of lower leg
  • S93.0 - Subluxation and dislocation of ankle joint
  • S92.1 - Fracture of talus
Diseases
  • M87.0 - Idiopathic aseptic necrosis of bone
Osteosynthesis
  • S72.1 - Pertrochanteric fracture
  • S72.2 - Subtrochanteric fracture of femur
  • S72.3 - Fracture of shaft of femur
  • S72.4 - Fracture of lower end of femur
Injury
  • S72.1 - Pertrochanteric fracture
  • S72.2 - Subtrochanteric fracture of femur
  • S72.3 - Fracture of shaft of femur
  • S72.4 - Fracture of lower end of femur
Diseases
  • M16.9 -Osteoarthritis of hip, unspecified
  • M87.0 - Idiopathic aseptic necrosis of bone
  • M93.9 - Osteochondropathy, unspecified
Osteosynthesis
  • S82.1 - Fracture of upper end of tibia
  • S82.2 - Fracture of shaft of tibia
  • S82.3 - Fracture of lower end of tibia
  • S82.4 - Fracture of shaft of fibula
  • S82.5 - Fracture of medial malleolus
  • S82.6 - Fracture of lateral malleolus
  • S82.8 - Other fractures of lower leg
Injury
  • S82.1 - Fracture of upper end of tibia
  • S82.2 - Fracture of shaft of tibia
  • S82.3 - Fracture of lower end of tibia
  • S82.4 - Fracture of shaft of fibula
  • S86.0 - Injury of Achilles tendon
  • S86.1 - Injury of other muscle(s) and tendon(s) of posterior muscle group at lower leg level
Diseases
  • M93.9 - Osteochondropathy, unspecified
Reduce the Risk of Complications
With Smart Crutch Tips, your doctor can monitor the course of rehabilitation and help you avoid complications
a) fracture of osseous or intraosseous fixator screws
b) migration of screws or spokes
c) plate fracture
d) fracture of the intramedullary shaft
e) rupture of the wire seam
Fracture of the latch:
a) deformation of the plate
b) deformation of the intramedullary shaft
c) deformation of the locking screws of the intramedullary retainer
Lock deformation:
a) loosening of osseous retainer screws
b) migration of screws or spokes
c) loosening of intramedullary retainer locking screws
d) loosening of the intramedullary shaft
e) loosening of the blade of the osseous plate or blocked epiphyseal screws (LCP, DHS, DCS systems)
f) teething of wire seam
Aseptic loosening of retainer elements:
Complications related to limb-fixing device
Late load complications
a) vein thrombosis of the lower extremities
b) thromboembolic complications
c) muscle and joint contractures
d) muscle weakness and muscle volume reduction
e) gait stereotype disturbances
Complications related to internal orthopedic device
a) transplant migration
b) transplant fracture
c) fixation migration after consolidation is completed
a) loosening or teething of spokes or transosseous rods of an external fixer
b) fracture of spokes or transosseous rods of an external fixator
c) destabilization or damage to the external structure of the AVF
Complications related to bone device
a) fixation plates and screws break muscle weakness
b) Dislocation of prosthesis joint contractures
c) Bone density loss gait disturbances
d) Blood clots
e) Muscle atrophy
Complications due to Nonadherence to Weight-Bearing Instructions
Testimonials & Quotes
Opinion of doctors
Richard Hudson
Physical therapist
William Moody
Fracture of the medial malleolus
Patient Reviews
It took some time to learn how to step without overloading my injured leg, but crutch tips help a lot with that. It is really very convenient that I can monitor by myself my daily activities such as how hard I pressed, how many steps I took, and so on. What I'd like to be added to the app is a day by day recommendation regarding exercising and other activities that I need to accomplish to ensure quick rehab progress.
Ruby Hubbard
Endoprosthetics
There is an urgent need to support patients' recovery outside of the clinic wall. We will now be able to send people home with instructions and instrumented exercise equipment that can actually measure and monitor what they are doing at home and, in some cases, adjust exercises as they go
My physiotherapist helped to set up Smart Crutch Tips & Mobile App on my cell phone, and we checked together how it worked, which took not more than 5 minutes in total. After just a day, I managed to get into the recommended loading. Every day I look at the data on the steps. It's great that there are different alerts. The voice is suitable when not in crowded places, but honestly, I prefer vibration on my phone and light notifications.
Frequently Asked Questions
Why a device on crutches and not in the shoe?
The idea of attaching Smart Tips to crutches was tested with real patients, and unlike insoles, Smart Crutch Tips are:
1. Always with the patient, even at night, when the patient is barefoot
2. More durable - 2 years of use
3. Available to consumers of any age and shoe size
4. More affordable to implement
5. Fit the reusable model
How is weight-bearing measured?
When walking on crutches, there is a moment during which the healthy leg is completed lifted off the ground and the entire load is distributed between the crutches and the injured leg.
We can determine how much load is placed on the injured limb by subtracting the amount of weight on the crutches from the patient's body weight. For example: if a patient's weight is 80 kg and during a step he transferred 60 kg to crutches, then 20kg of pressure was exerted on the injured limb.
How accurate is the data collected from the smart crutch device?
The error of weight sensors is less than 100 grams. We have calculated everything for safe use and a speedy recovery
What are the minimum and maximum weight-bearing thresholds?
The amount of initial weight bearing can be set from 0% NWB to 50% PWB. The upper threshold for graduated WBAT is 80%.
Smart Crutch Tips can be used with what pathologies and injuries?
The Smart Crutch Tips device can be used by patients recovering from nonsurgical and surgical treatments for hip, thigh, knee, shin, ankle, and foot injuries and pathologies
Are Smart Crutch Tips compatible with canes?
Yes! A patient can begin their gait rehabilitation on crutches and progress to a cane for quality gait progression
Free Crutch Tip Demonstration
ComeBack Mobility^
– FOR THE DOCTOR
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Weight-bearing tracking service to control the load on the injured leg during rehabilitation
ComeBack Mobility Inc.
301 E 103rd St,
New York, NY 10029, USA

Support: 848 900 3224
support@comebackmobility.com

Partnership: 312 927 4108

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